5 Mistakes Coaches Make with Their Website

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How to Design a Great Coming Soon Page for Your Website

A coming soon page is a temporary page on your website that is displayed to all visitors. Professional coaches tend to use a coming soon page prior to a big website launch or rebrand.

I most commonly use coming soon pages as a temporary placeholder while I’m building a client’s website. A web design project can take upwards of 3-4 months, so a coming soon page is a great option if they don’t already have a website in place.

However, coming soon pages might not be for everyone. Before we discuss how to design a great coming soon page, let’s decide if a coming soon page would be the best solution for your business at this time.

Do I need a Coming Soon page?

You’re likely in one of two situations: you either have a website already or don’t.

If you don’t already have a website, I definitely recommend a coming soon page while you’re working on the full website.

If you already have a website and it stands really outdated, off-brand and not serving your business, I would recommend popping up a simple coming soon page prior to launching your new website.

The instance I wouldn’t recommend a coming soon page is if your website is currently bringing you in new business or generating revenue for you. A coming soon page, depending on how it’s built, might stand in the way of incoming revenue or new clients. And we don’t want that. So in this case, I’d recommend keeping up what you’ve got and then just launching the new site when it’s ready.

Okay… so ready to build your coming soon page?

Before you dive into the build – you’ll need to decide what action you want your visitors to take upon landing on your coming soon page.

A coming soon page is much more than a page that says Coming Soon! with a countdown. It needs to be strategic. It needs to invite visitors to take action.

For professional coaches, you’ll likely have one of the following calls-to-action:

  1. Subscribe to your list.
  2. Book a consult call.

In some instances, you’ll have both of the above… but you’ll want to have a primary. Don’t make things complicated on your visitors, make it crystal clear on the action you want them to take.

Once you decide on the primary call to action, next comes the copy.

The copy for your coming soon page should be brief yet informative.

You copy will vary depending on your call to action, but in both cases, you’ll want to summarize in a couple of sentences what’s coming soon (your new website), when it’s coming (your launch date) and what they should do in the meantime (your call to action).

You’ll want to come up with the following copy for your page:

  1. The main heading. This is an attention grabber or immediate qualifier. This helps your visitors immediately know they’re in the right place.
  2. A descriptive and guiding paragraph. This briefly informs visitors what’s happening with your site, what to expect and how to connect with you.

Only after you have your call to action and copy down, you’ll be ready to begin designing.

I like to think of designing as putting pieces of a puzzle together. Every you’ve worked so hard to create is now ready to effortless be pieced together in something beautiful.

These are the steps I take when designing a coming soon page:

  1. Choose a primary image. This could be stock, branded photography or pattern. The image should portray the feeling you help your clients achieve.
  2. Choose a complimentary color scheme. You might not have your new brand colors established just yet at this phase. So I like to keep things neutral and complimentary to the image chosen.
  3. Choose a font pairing that compliments both of the above. Pinterest is a great place to browse font pairings. Fonts create feelings, too. So when picking a font, be sure to stay on brand with the feeling you’re creating for your clients.
  4. Build it out! Pull all of the pieces above together and build it out on a single page where everything fits above the fold (aka no matter your visitor’s screen size, they should see everything without scrolling as soon as the page loads).

Here are few coming soon page designs provided for a recent client who owns a coaching and consulting business.

Pergendum Coaching & Consulting has been in business for several years but growing via word of mouth. They don’t have a current website and wanted something up on their domain while we were working on the full site.

The primary call to action is for prospective clients to book a consult call. The Book a Call would lead to a contact form. The secondary call to action is to capture the information of those who aren’t quite ready to be clients just yet but would still like to stay in touch.

Below are the three initial designs provided to the client:

Tree Line / Horizon Coming Soon Page

Modern Professional Coming Soon Page

Option 3 – Soft Creative Coming Soon Page


Need some more visual inspiration for your own coming soon page? Click here to check out my Web Design Inspiration board over on Pinterest.


Bonus tip! Should social media profile links be included?

Great question! And if you flip through Pinterest, you’ll likely think the answer would be yes. But it’s actually a really, really bad idea.

If you include your social media icons on your coming soon page you’ll ultimately invite your visitors to go get distracted on social media versus taking the strategic action you’re trying to lead them to.

If you want to connect with your visitors on social media, that’s totally fine… but invite them to those profiles only AFTER they opt-in or book a call for you. So on your thank you page or confirmation page include a note that you’d love to connect with them over on LinkedIn with a link. But NEVER make that your primary call to action OR even a link that competes with your primary call to action.

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